ART EXHIBITIONS ON NOW: FEBRUARY 2019

1. The C C Land Exhibition Pierre Bonnard: The Colour of Memory

Pierre Bonnard Le Jardin 1936 Musée d’Art moderne de la Ville de Paris (Paris, France)

Pierre Bonnard Le Jardin 1936 Musée d’Art moderne de la Ville de Paris (Paris, France)

Many artists have been eagerly awaiting this show of Bonnard’s beautiful, unconventionally coloured, bright paintings. Along with Matisse, Bonnard is one of the best known colourist of the 20th century; working from memory his work captures a moment and is deeply expressive.

This exhibition was organised with the Tate Modern in collaboration with Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek, Copenhagen and Kunstforum Wien.

2. Whistler & Nature

James McNeill Whistler, Nocturne, 1875 – 1877 © The Hunterian, University of Glasgow

James McNeill Whistler, Nocturne, 1875 – 1877 © The Hunterian, University of Glasgow

Whistler declared: ‘Nature contains the elements, in colour and form, of all pictures, as the keyboard contains the notes of all music’.

Whistler & Nature features 90 of the great late-Victorian master, James McNeill Whistler’s paintings, sketches and prints. It focuses upon his life from working in the US military through to his perspective on British landscape painting and British design. Many of the works present the modern Victorian age as a wealthy, productive, moving subject with swirls of mist and smoke surrounding warehouses and harbours.

The Hunterian, University of Glasgow developed this exhibition in partnership with Compton Verney.

3. John Kørner: Life in a Box

Leaving the sun, 2018, acrylic on canvas, 180 x 150 cm, 70 7/8 x 59 1/8 in, © John Kørner, courtesy the artist and Victoria Miro, London/Venice 

John Kørner, Leaving the sun, 2018, acrylic on canvas, 180 x 150 cm, 70 7/8 x 59 1/8 in, © John Kørner, courtesy the artist and Victoria Miro, London/Venice

Copenhagen-based artist John Kørner creates pieces that confront and explore topical content, seeping them in abstraction and metaphor in order to speak across boundaries. Using paintings and installations he creates a three-dimensional space for the audience to contemplate his ‘problems’ which emerge as egg like forms both in his work and the world, alluding to how we deal with the issues we perceive.

4. Bill Viola / Michelangelo: Life Death Rebirth

Bill Viola, Tristan’s Ascension (The Sound of a Mountain Under a Waterfall), 2005. Video/sound installation. Performer: John Hay. Courtesy Bill Viola Studio. Photo: Kira Perov.

Bill Viola,
Tristan’s Ascension (The Sound of a Mountain Under a Waterfall), 2005.
Video/sound installation. Performer: John Hay. Courtesy Bill Viola Studio. Photo: Kira Perov.

Comparing two artists hundreds of years apart is a curious thing. The pairing of the video artist Bill Viola with the famous Renaissance master Michelangelo relies entirely upon the strength of both artist themes. The curation of the show leads one through the cycle of life, including it’s beauty, emotional upheavals, birth and death.

5. Flourish Award 2018

Flourish awards with Hazel Roberts pieces to the right

Flourish awards with Hazel Roberts pieces to the right

Now in its 10th year, Flourish Award, set up by the West Yorkshire Print Workshop ,shows the top work of Yorkshire printmakers and artists. Exhibiting artists include Hazel Roberts, Jemma Gunning, John Angus, Kathryn Desforges, Maxine Foster, Michaela Wheater, Nazanin Moradi, Neil Bousfield, Nicole Polonsky, Nigel Morris, Sara Lee, Sin Park and Theresa Taylor.

6. Anna Boghiguian

Anna Boghiguian, Promenade dans l’inconscient 2016  (A Walk in the Unconscious 2016), exhibition viewl. Photograph Photo © David Huguenin

Anna Boghiguian, Promenade dans l’inconscient 2016  (A Walk in the Unconscious 2016), exhibition viewl. Photograph Photo © David Huguenin

Anna Boghiguian is a Egyptian-Canadian artist of Armenian origin, whose work is inspired by philosophy and her constant travelling. This large scale installation together with paintings, collages, books and elements of the artists studio as with much of Boghiguian’s work, looks at the human condition and the effects of global trade, colonialism, migration and war.

This show was supported by a grant from Canada House and curated by Carolyn Christov-Bakargiev, Director, and Marianna Vecellio, Curator, Castello di Rivoli Museo d’Arte Contemporanea, Rivoli-Torino with Anne Barlow, Director Tate St Ives.

7. Freud, Dalí and the Metamorphosis of Narcissus

Salvador Dali, The Metamorphosis of Narcissus © Salvador Dali, Fundació Gala-Salvador Dalí, DACS 2018

Salvador Dali, The Metamorphosis of Narcissus © Salvador Dali, Fundació Gala-Salvador Dalí, DACS 2018

Both Surrealism and psychoanalysis attempt to explore elements of the unconscious, albeit one verbally and the other visually. Starting from Sigmund Freud and Salvador Dalí’s one meeting and including a piece Dalí brought with him The Metamorphosis of Narcissus, this exhibition illuminates how Freud’s work affected and influenced both Dalí and Surrealism. It also looks at Freud’s relationship to painting and theory around critical paranoia and the Narcissus myth.